fbpx
Classful Classful Shop

An old Irish proverb says: “Questioning is the door of knowledge.”

Life is full of things to be curious about, so let’s dive in and think about 20 questions that make you wonder.

Education resources

View all
Thanksgiving Telling Time Game to 5 Minutes

Thanksgiving Telling Time Game to 5 Minutes

$2.25
Inauguration Day Word Search | HARD Puzzle | Ready to Go!

Inauguration Day Word Search | HARD Puzzle | Ready to Go!

$1.25
Google Classroom DIGITAL Music Theory UNIT 5 BUNDLE Lessons 17-20 - Self-Grading

Google Classroom DIGITAL Music Theory UNIT 5 BUNDLE Lessons 17-20 - Self-Grading

$7.65
Solving Quadratics by Square Root Method Differentiated Partner Worksheets

Solving Quadratics by Square Root Method Differentiated Partner Worksheets

$2.00
Preschool/Kinder Music, Snowmen, Snowflakes, Winter, Coloring ,Chants, Worksheets

Preschool/Kinder Music, Snowmen, Snowflakes, Winter, Coloring ,Chants, Worksheets

$3.00
Civil War Social Studies Reading Comprehension Passages K-2

Civil War Social Studies Reading Comprehension Passages K-2

$4.00
Catholic Prayer Posters

Catholic Prayer Posters

$3.00
St. Patrick's Day Activities| Word Searches| Crosswords| Puzzles| Bookmarks| Writing

St. Patrick's Day Activities| Word Searches| Crosswords| Puzzles| Bookmarks| Writing

$3.00
Real World Math - How Architects Use Math in their Career

Real World Math - How Architects Use Math in their Career

$2.50

I Wonder: What is it?

“I Wonder” questions are just what they sound like: The beginning of a statement that asks for more information on a topic. Showing enthusiasm when a student states that they wonder about something — anything, really — is a delightful gift and often opens doorways to learning and excellent discussions.

Educators see those sparks come alive in students’ eyes when they are encouraged to open their minds and let them travel to questions that pop right up. Students can wonder aloud or write down the thoughts as they come, such as in an “I Wonder” journal, on a large classroom whiteboard, or elsewhere.

Specific topics

Perhaps each topic in school has a dedicated notebook; within each, they have a section at the back wholly devoted to questions that appear. These questions may occur to them while studying the subject or even out of the blue while they exercise, have lunch, or travel in a car or bus. These questions can be addressed later to their teacher or during class discussions. It’s a beautiful way to involve everyone.

Devoted journal

The “I Wonder” journal is something many teachers recommend and students enjoy. It can be a notebook of any size, something special like a fancy, covered blank book, or a hand-made bundle of an art paper with a creative binding. Students can wonder how to make their journal unique, then pursue different creative ways to do so, perhaps as a fun art project.

It’s only human

Children of all ages, and adult students too, have questions as they learn — this is a human element. Kids may ask, “when is this project due, and how will it be graded?” or “where will I use this math formula in a real-life setting?” They will think of thousands of questions throughout their school years, some being very serious and philosophical and others whimsical or lighthearted. All questions can be researched, and classmates, as well as teachers, can take the opportunity to learn something brand new. We learn from our questions and answers and those presented by others.

Build on those questions

Teachers can even choose some of the more intriguing and thought-provoking questions delivered by students and “run with it” in their classroom. A single question can lead to an enlightening hours-long discussion or even develop into a brand new lesson or significant class project. Harness that fresh student curiosity and let it work for everyone.

Encourage wonder

It is always a fantastic idea to applaud the questions wondered aloud by students, even if they appear to be off-topic or a bit distracting. Write them down for later and re-approach the subject at a better time. If it relates to the topic at hand, answer or research for an answer if time allows. If there is a dedicated whiteboard, place it there as a reminder.

We all know that our brain makes connections and sometimes veers in different directions, but sometimes if we don’t ask a question the minute it appears in our conscious mind, it may drift away again. If it proves too disruptive, have students at least jot down their questions right away on their paper so they can bring them up later. Some educators like to use sticky notes they can collect. Keep time set aside to revisit these notes.

Respect & expansive growth

Children love it when their questions and curiosity are honored and respected. Some people apply their I Wonder applications throughout life, even after school. The I Wonder journal concept can travel with them throughout their lives. There are so many questions that come up in the average human brain. Indeed, we could all have unlimited journals to record them all.

Collecting our thoughts & examining inquiries

For teachers who set aside questions for a particular time, some celebrate that time almost like a party. For example, a class may say that the first school day of each month is I Wonder Day. They may bring special treats and arrange the room in a circle, and the teacher has an organized viewing and discussion of that month’s pressing questions as collected from each student. It can be a very enjoyable and knowledgeable event. When the kids are involved with the questions, the research, the answers, and the follow-up conversations, they are more likely to be passionate and absorbed.

Follow their lead

Instructors can gain great insights into lesson planning and presentation by following their students’ question journeys. A general topic like biology or astronomy can be narrowed down to sub-categories the students seem enthralled with and, therefore, to which they are more apt to pay attention. Perhaps marine life is a significant interest for many students, or black holes and outer galaxies delight the class. Cover more information on those topics that interest them whenever possible and logically.

When a child can’t come up with a question, ask them something exciting, and it’s sure to get their brain juices flowing with follow-up questions.

20 things to wonder about

The fabulous I Wonder questions from curious pupils can be about virtually anything. Here are some examples of general I Wonder questions that can start good conversations or provoke even more fun inquiries:

  1. If you could meet any famous historical figure, who would it be?
  2. Why are some birds unable to fly?
  3. Where would you travel right this minute if it could be on Earth?
  4. Who decides which clothing styles are in fashion?
  5. Which superpower would you choose — Flying, invisibility, or super-strength?
  6. Why do people lie?
  7. Why the sky looks blue?
  8. What is dirt made of?
  9. If animals could speak and understand, what would you ask?
  10. Who invented fabric?
  11. Why do certain types of music make us feel better?
  12. What was the happiest day of your life (so far)?
  13. Why do we have nightmares and dreams?
  14. What would help the entire world the most right now?
  15. What type of animal makes the best pet?
  16. What chore would you get rid of forever?
  17. Could people live on Mars?
  18. Why do people have hair on their heads?
  19. What gives fruits and vegetables their specific colors?
  20. Who invented weekdays and weekends, and why?

Questions can arise from everyday observations and thoughts and go into deeper human considerations. Every question allows us to connect and learn. Take those I Wonder queries and have an enjoyable, illuminating time growing with young and old students in formal learning settings and outside school.