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Students struggling with reading or being formally diagnosed with dyslexia can be a unique challenge for teachers.

Especially in the earlier years, where learning to read and write matters, extra help is necessary to ensure all your students can thrive. But according to, recent studies show that dyslexia, or struggling to read, is not the be-all and end-all diagnosis they once were. It appears that time spent working with students to overcome their problems with reading can make a complete difference in their quality of learning in the future.

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AP LEQ Writing Practice- Harry Potter Style!

AP LEQ Writing Practice- Harry Potter Style!

$7.00
Elementary Reading Log - Grades 3 to 5

Elementary Reading Log - Grades 3 to 5

$3.00
Grammar worksheets mega bundle - sentence structure, nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs

Grammar worksheets mega bundle - sentence structure, nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs

$31.02 $36.49
Commutative Property of Multiplication Solve the Room Active Math Activity

Commutative Property of Multiplication Solve the Room Active Math Activity

$2.50
Cutting Angles and Notches (occupational therapy)

Cutting Angles and Notches (occupational therapy)

$2.50
Subtracting Numbers 1-10 (One Digit) APPEARING/DISAPPEARING PPT GAME; For K-5 Teachers and Students in the Math Classroom

Subtracting Numbers 1-10 (One Digit) APPEARING/DISAPPEARING PPT GAME; For K-5 Teachers and Students in the Math Classroom

$2.99
Sight Word Assessments and Certificates

Sight Word Assessments and Certificates

$3.00
Process Skills of Science

Process Skills of Science

$1.49
Circles and Semicircles Task Cards (Now Includes Digital Version)

Circles and Semicircles Task Cards (Now Includes Digital Version)

$3.25

What exactly is dyslexia?

The International Dyslexia Association classifies the condition as:

  • A language-based learning disability that impacts language and reading skills
  • A condition where individuals have difficulty with the writing, spelling, and pronunciation of words
  • A cluster of symptoms that may differ from person to person, which all focus on language skills but may also manifest as physical and emotional frustration and stress

Dyslexia isn’t a one-size-fits-all diagnosis. It’s possible to be mildly dyslexic and only need a little support and extra work or have severe dyslexia and need significant input to help you to succeed in a traditional education environment. When it comes to helping students with dyslexia, this should be considered, as what works perfectly for one student with dyslexia may not be quite as applicable for another.

Is dyslexia a permanent diagnosis?

According to the National Science Foundation, dyslexia isn’t as permanent as we once thought. In fact, with specialized instruction and one-on-one support, it’s been seen that students with dyslexic symptoms soon improved upon their reading skills based on MRI data. This research seems to suggest that a little additional support and care can go a long way toward offering dyslexic students a brighter future, allowing them to ‘rewire’ their brains to understand better and appreciate language.

With this insight and the knowledge that support for those with dyslexia can make all the difference, teachers can better support their students. If you’re wondering how we can best support children needing that extra push, here are a few options.

How teachers can help students with dyslexia?

The first way that teachers can work to help students with dyslexia is by being able to spot children who are struggling with language skills in particular. By keeping alert and engaged with our student’s work in class, we can catch problems with reading and writing earlier, allowing us to work with parents to get them the support they need. Many students have years of frustration and struggle between starting to read and getting a diagnosis. Understanding the symptoms can allow teachers to get in there sooner and allow students to catch up to their peers faster with added support.

Secondly, teachers can provide dyslexic students additional support by working on their symbol imagery. This concept is the ability for us to ‘see’ letters in our minds when we need them, and, alongside spelling, these are vital parts of processing phonics. The more fluent your student is, the stronger their ability to use symbol imagery. By keeping a close eye on struggling students, we can help to rewire their brains to develop this imagery. We can check their understanding of the text they’re reading and teach a few common words for each new book.

Finally, the best way to help a student with dyslexia is to know when additional support is needed. With 25+ kids in the average classroom, it’s simply impossible to give individual children the support they need when they struggle. Knowing when to speak to the parents, or the school administration, about additional lessons or even a class aide, can make all the difference and help struggling children stay on track with their reading and writing.

How do you help children with dyslexia in your classroom?