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An individual, throughout their life, will come across multiple people with different cultural upbringings, beliefs, and ideals.

To learn and work with people who are different from us, it is important to be tolerant of others.

Tolerance is something that should be learned as a child and is something that I have found to be essential for child development. Children need to be able to work with others and understand different cultures to them to be able to grow and contribute positively to their community.

Education resources

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Halloween Coloring Kit: Vocabulary Flashcards and Sheet

Halloween Coloring Kit: Vocabulary Flashcards and Sheet

$3.00
Math Vocabulary (Brights) Set 1

Math Vocabulary (Brights) Set 1

$2.00
More/Less Task Cards- Greater Than Less Than-Fall Theme- Autism & SPED Resources

More/Less Task Cards- Greater Than Less Than-Fall Theme- Autism & SPED Resources

$3.00
'The Name Game' for Barton Book 4

'The Name Game' for Barton Book 4

Free
Chalkboard Farmhouse Classroom Decor Flip Calendar Display - Scribble Font

Chalkboard Farmhouse Classroom Decor Flip Calendar Display - Scribble Font

$3.00
Christmas Division Facts 0 to 12 Santa Elf Reindeer Game

Christmas Division Facts 0 to 12 Santa Elf Reindeer Game

$2.50
Adding and Subtracting Base Ten/Place Value Two-Digit Numbers Task Cards or Scoot; For K-5 Teachers and Students in the Math Classroom

Adding and Subtracting Base Ten/Place Value Two-Digit Numbers Task Cards or Scoot; For K-5 Teachers and Students in the Math Classroom

$1.99
Pastel Rainbow Rolling Cart Labels (EDITABLE)

Pastel Rainbow Rolling Cart Labels (EDITABLE)

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Posters La Oración (The sentence in Spanish)

Posters La Oración (The sentence in Spanish)

$1.00

What is tolerance?

Tolerance is not allowing or ignoring bad behavior. Tolerance is treating others how you wish to be treated and working with them regardless of whether you support their beliefs.

Suppose a child is not taught to be tolerant. In that case, they could make insensitive remarks that are hurtful and offensive without even realizing it or become isolated at school as they feel alienated by those different from them.

How to teach a child about tolerance

As with many things in child development, I have learned that practicing is always better than preaching. Tolerance can be difficult for younger children to understand, so I have outlined some of the best ways to teach a child about tolerance below…

Engage with other cultures

Explore traditions, holidays, and customs outside of your own beliefs with your child and allow them to see that learning about other cultures is fun and should not be avoided.

Use positive language

Simple remarks about how you feel ‘fat’ can damage your child and teach them not to be tolerant of people who look a certain way. Remember to only talk about yourself and those around you in a positive way and if your child ever asks you why someone looks different to them, reply that everyone looks different, and that is what makes us all unique.

Remind your child to be confident

A child that is confident in their own beliefs shouldn’t need to tear others down. Raising your child to be confident and self-assured will enable them to be tolerant of others while remaining secure in their beliefs.

Give your child the opportunity to travel

Whether you go on a family holiday or send your child to a summer camp in a different state, giving your child a chance to be immersed in a new location and experience different cultures will help them to understand not everyone has the same lifestyle as them and this is something normal and should be tolerated.

Why is tolerance important for child development?

As society is growing increasingly advanced and diverse, tolerance is essential for a child to succeed in their future life. A tolerant child can enter the adult world as a respectful individual who is confident in their beliefs.

A child must have a strong, tolerant role model who can aid their development; this could be a teacher or a parent. Children need to be taught to be tolerant of different religions, cultures, physical appearances, and disabilities to ensure they grow up as adults who will succeed in our diverse nation.